Jonathan Livingston Crab

Good friends in a pinch! Forums Chewin’ the Choya Jonathan Livingston Crab

This topic contains 25 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Judy Christopher 5 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)
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  • #6948

    Carol Ann Ormes
    Participant

    Hi Crab Friends,

    Some of you may remember me. I went by Carol of Crabworks for years, now just using my regular address. I helped name this group and assisted in running the group it split off from.

    Just wanted to tell you that Jonathan has been in my care for 40 1/2 years! He is full of pep, runs all around my apartment, follows me around too. He’s in a big green turbo shell, has successful molts every year (except for having two molts last year). If you remember, I also had Crab Kate.She died unexpectedly five years ago, 35 years in my care. Jon seems to be doing well on his own.

    Just wanted some of my old crab friends to know about Jonathan. Please drop me a line if you can.

    Blessings, Carol Ann Ormes, formerly Carol of CrabWorks, in sunny SW Florida

    #6949

    Mary
    Participant

    Hi! So glad to have an update from you. 🤗 Hope to see pictures soon!! 😌

    Mary

    #6952

    Pam
    Participant

    Hi Carol Ann,
    I have read your story so many times. I am so happy to hear Jonathan is still chasing you around. It is an honor to say hello and hope to learn from your success with hermit crabs. I hope you will share pictures of him and his home. Please keep in touch.

    Pam

    #6953

    Jenny
    Participant

    Dear Carol Anne,

    I am so happy to learn that Jonathan is doing well! I wanted to let you know that it was an article in a newspaper about you, Jonathan Livingston Crab, and Crab Kate that inspired me to take up crab critter-keeping a few months ago. I had bought hermit crabs at the shore as a child, but I couldn’t figure out as a child why they always died in those little wire cages. I always just thought that hermit crabs couldn’t survive in captivity. You’ve been an inspiration for me! I had no idea that hermit crabs had such a long lifespan, until I read your article. Thank you so much for your contribution to educating hermit crab owners, and thank you for your excellent ownership of your crabs that has provided them such long, happy, healthy lives!

    Best wishes,

    Jenny

    #6954

    Carol Ann Ormes
    Participant

    I tried to reply, but it said I couldn’t because of an error. Oh my, just when I got on here.

    Carol Ann

    #6955

    Carol Ann Ormes
    Participant

    I tried again to reply but get this message: ERROR: Your reply cannot be created at this time. Can you help me here?

    Thanks, Carol Ann

    #6956

    Stacy
    Keymaster

    Carol your reply went through! So happy to see you here 🙂

    #6957

    Carol Ann Ormes
    Participant

    Stacy, the rather long reply I wrote didn’t go through and now I’ve lost it. Will write again soon as I get the time. My most recent photos of Jonathan are on my iPad and I don’t know anymore how to send photos here, or even to add a photo of me. This site has made some great changes–a store, much informations, lots of photos, etc. Thanks for your reply.
    Carol Ann

    #6974

    Beth
    Participant

    Hello Carol, it seems as though this is the only way I can get in touch with you. The emails I have tried to send the last couple of days won’t go through. They get returned, unable to send. Sometimes they go through, sometimes they don’t. I have no idea…sounds like you are a busy lady, so nice for you to volunteer to your condo association! Have you heard about the hermit crab craze? Two things, hermit crab hamster wheels! They love them! Sometimes they fight over them like kids on the playground! So much time is spent walking in the wild, so, at least we can give them something where they can walk for a long period of time. We are not as lucky as you, most of us cannot let our crabs out all day! I wish I could, I would love it! Also, Stacy Griffith has “green sand”, and the crabs practically inhale it, it is the first thing they eat when I put it in the crabitat. Sending a pic of the crabs enjoying the wheel, hope it makes you laugh.

    Beth

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    #6976

    Beth
    Participant

    Another wheel pic

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    #6978

    Beth
    Participant

    It only took them a few minutes to figure out how to use it. Once they did, it was walk walk walk!

    #6979

    Carol Ann Ormes
    Participant

    Beth, I don’t know why your emails don’t go through to me…well, some of them did and I replied to a number of them about the sea shells.

    Haven’t seen those crab hamster wheels. Jon would be too big for that now, but fun to see yours. I am interested in “green sand.” I presume that’s a food. Jon needs something new to eat. Where do you get it?

    Carol Ann, too busy for her own good. 🙂

    #6989

    Beth
    Participant

    Carol Ann, Stacy Griffith has the green sand, she can tell you what is in it. The wheels are actually hamster wheels. My big female can fit on the one I bought, it is a large plastic wheel from Petsmart. People like me, that cannot provide outside the tank exercise due to low humidity in the home, use the wheels. They do love to walk. We believe it mimics all of the miles they may walk in the wild. I do have to watch them, they can get a little pushy with each other. Sometimes, they do behave, and take turns. It really is funny to watch!

    Beth

    #6990

    Stacy
    Keymaster

    Carol I will happily send you some greensand and worm castings or anything else from my store that you would like to try. You can email photos to me and I can post them if you like? crabstreetjournal@gmail.com

    This is from Wikipedia but I think you are more likely to be able to put this in laymans terms for US! I know it comes from the ocean and the crabs devour it.

    Greensand or Green sand is either a sand or sandstone, which has a greenish color. This term is specifically applied to shallow marine sediment, that contains noticeable quantities of rounded greenish grains. These grains are called glauconies and consist of a mixture of mixed-layer clay minerals, such as smectite and glauconite mica. Greensand is also loosely applied to any glauconitic sediment.[1][2][3]

    Greensand forms in anoxic marine environments that are rich in organic detritus and low in sedimentary input.[1] Having accumulated in marine environments, greensands can be fossil-rich, such as in the late-Cretaceous deposits of New Jersey, USA.[4]

    #6991

    Beth
    Participant

    It is sold here, in Stacy’s store. Please look in the “Market” section, and choose “must have” on the right. When you see the green sand, click on pic, and there you can read the information.

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