Tag Archive for body

Coenobita Gonopore

Gonpores are the openings of reproductive system to exterior. In male, pore on basal segment (coxa) of last (eighth) thoracopods; in female, pore on coxa of sixth thoracopods (third pereopods) [1]

Coenobita rugosus has been found to be intersexual

Location of gonopores in male and female Coenobita

Location of gonopores in male and female Coenobita

 

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Overview of the anatomy of a land hermit crab (Coenobita)

References:
1 Stachowitsch, 1992

Coenobita Shield

The Cephalic shield [1] or carapace is part of the exoskeleton that covers the cephalothorax. It functions as a protective cover, hence the common name ‘shield’.

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Overview of the anatomy of a land hermit crab (Coenobita)

Photo credits:
HUSO Chen Yu-Jung

Stacy Griffith

References:

  1. Dardanus megistos by Storm Martin 2012

Coenobita chela and cheliped

Chela (organ)

A chela /kˈiːlə/, also named claw, nipper or pincer, is a pincer-like organ terminating certain limbs of some arthropods.[1] The name comes from Greek (χηλή) through New Latin (chela). The plural form is chelae.[2] Legs bearing a chela are called chelipeds.[3] Another name is claw because most chelae are curved and have a sharp point like a claw.

Also called pincer or pincher.

We are building image galleries of specific body parts. If you have high resolution, clear photos that you would like to donate to this project please contact us via email: crabstreetjournal at gmail dot com


Overview of the anatomy of a land hermit crab (Coenobita)

Photo Credits:
The Crab Street Journal has been granted permission by these photographers to use their photo(s) on our site.

References
1 Dean Pentcheff. “Chela”. Crustacea glossary. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Retrieved November 28, 2011.
2 George Gordh, Gordon Gordh & David Headrick (2003). A Dictionary of Entomology. CAB International. p. 182. ISBN 978-0-85199-655-4.
3 Dean Pentcheff. “Cheliped“. Crustacea glossary. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Retrieved November 28, 2011.

Coenobita eyes

Coenobita possess compound eyes comprised of faceted lenses which are especially adept at picking up fine movements. The eyes are located on movable stalks and this is one of the primary ways we determine the species of hermit crab we are looking at.

Reconstructed brains of Fuxianhuia protensa and land hermit crab Coenobita clypeatus showing homologies with Malacostraca. They share 3 nested neuropils in each eye stalk (arrowed 1-3), A1n (antennal nerve), A2n (second pair of nerve roots), op t (optic tract).

Reconstructed brains of Fuxianhuia protensa and land hermit crab Coenobita clypeatus showing homologies with Malacostraca. They share 3 nested neuropils in each eye stalk (arrowed 1-3), A1n (antennal nerve), A2n (second pair of nerve roots), op t (optic tract).

 

Hermit Crab Antenna Eyes Diagram by Storm Martin 2012

Hermit Crab Antenna Eyes Diagram by Storm Martin 2012

 

We are building image galleries of specific body parts. If you have high resolution, clear photos that you would like to donate to this project please contact us via email: crabstreetjournal at gmail dot com

Overview of the anatomy of a land hermit crab (Coenobita)

Photo Credits:
The Crab Street Journal has been granted permission by these photographers to use their photo(s) on our site.
Sean Carroll

Heather Heaton

Stacy Griffith

Coenobita Gills

The gills of Coenobita and Birgus are modified for air-breathing but are reduced in number and size and have a comparatively small surface area. The branchiostegal lungs of Coenobita (which live in gastropod shells) are very small but are well vascularized and have a thin blood/gas barrier. Coenobita has developed a third respiratory organ, the abdominal lung, that is formed from highly vascularized patches of very thin and intensely-folded dorsal integument. Oxygenated blood from this respiratory surface is returned to the pericardial sinus via the gills (in parallel to the branchiostegal circulation). Birgus, which does not inhabit a gastropod shell, has developed a highly complex branchiostegal lung that is expanded laterally and evaginated to increase surface area. The blood/gas diffusion distance is short and oxygenated blood is returned directly to the pericardium via pulmonary veins. We conclude that the presence of a protective mollusc shell in the terrestrial hermit crabs has favoured the evolution of an abdominal lung and in its absence a branchiostegal lung has been developed. [1]

We are building image galleries of specific body parts. If you have high resolution, clear photos that you would like to donate to this project please contact us via email: crabstreetjournal at gmail dot com


Overview of the anatomy of a land hermit crab (Coenobita)

References:
1 The morphology and vasculature of the respiratory organs of terrestrial hermit crabs (Coenobita and Birgus): gills, branchiostegal lungs and abdominal lungs
C.A. Farrellya, P. Greenawayb, ,
a 32 Tramway Pde. Beaumaris, Vic. 3193, Australia
b School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, N.S.W. 2052, Australia

Coenobita molt sac

The land hermit crab (Coenobita) develops a water sac inside of their shell prior to a molt. As shedding of the old exoskeleton begins, this store of water is used to expand the body to stretch and increase size before the soft exoskeleton begins to harden again

We are building image galleries of specific body parts. If you have high resolution, clear photos that you would like to donate to this project please contact us via email: crabstreetjournal at gmail dot com


Overview of the anatomy of a land hermit crab (Coenobita)

Coenobita gravid

grav·id: ˈɡravid/ adjective 1. pregnant; carrying eggs or young.

Land hermit crabs carry their brood inside of the shell until they are ready to be released into the ocean.

Gravid Coenobita purpureus Credit Felix Wang

Gravid Coenobita purpureus Credit Felix Wang

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Overview of the anatomy of a land hermit crab (Coenobita)

Coenobita Abdominal Appendages

The abdominal appendages of the land hermit crab include the thoracic appendages, pleopods, uropods and telson [1].
The thoracic appendages are used for cleaning the gills, gripping the shell, gripping a mate during copulation.

The pleopods are used for brooding eggs.

At the end of the pleon is the tail fan, comprising a pair of biramous uropods and the telson, which bears the anus. Together, they are used for steering while swimming, and in the caridoid escape reaction.

We are building image galleries of specific body parts. If you have high resolution, clear photos that you would like to donate to this project please contact us via email: crabstreetjournal at gmail dot com


Overview of the anatomy of a land hermit crab (Coenobita)

References:
1. Dardanus megistos by Storm Martin 2012

2. Robert P. D. Crean (November 14, 2004). “Characters and Anatomy”. Order Decapoda. University of Bristol. Retrieved April 23, 2012.

Anatomy of Land Hermit Crabs

Overview of the anatomy of a land hermit crab (Coenobita):

We are building image galleries of specific body parts. If you have high resolution, clear photos that you would like to donate to this project please contact us via email: crabstreetjournal at gmail dot com

Click to be taken to the gallery:
Chelipeds or pincers
Eyes
Antenna (antennal flagellum, antennular flagellum, antennule)
Mandibles and Maxipellid
Gills and branchial chamber
Abdomen, Uropods, Pleopods, Telson
Water or molt sac
Egg cluster
Gonopores
Shield